Psycho States of Consciousness part 2

Average rating : Published by ricogenesis on April 9th, 2015

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Question 1
An altered state of consciousness reported after a close brush with death (such as through cardiac arrest); often similar to drug-induced hallucinations.

Near-death experience
Dream
Nightmare
Question 2
The major active ingredient in marijuana; triggers a variety of effects, including mild hallucinations.

CBD
Chanvre
THC
Question 3
A response of the whole organism, involving psychological arousal, expressive behaviors, and conscious experience.

Sensation
Emotion
Thought
Question 4
The theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our psychological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli.

James-Lange theory
Cannon-James Theory
Cannon-Bard Theory
Question 5
The Shachter-Singer theory that experience emotion one must be physically aroused and cognitively label the arousal.

Dual processing
Two-factor theory
Dual theory
Question 6
The tendency of facial muscle states to trigger corresponding feelings, such as fear, anger, or happiness.

Facial feedback effect
Feedback effect
Commentary effect
Question 7
A need or desire that energies and directs behavior

Instinct
Motivation
Determination
Question 8
A complex behavior that is rigidly patterned throughghout a species and is unlearned.

Instinct
Expectation
Insight
Question 9
Drive-reduction theory

A tendency to maintain a balanced or constant internal state; the regulation of any aspect of body chemistry such as blood, glucose, around a particular level.
The idea that a physiological need creates an aroused tension state (a drive) that motivates an organism to satisfy the need.
A tendency to maintain a balanced or constant internal state; the regulation of any aspect of body chemistry such as blood, glucose, around a particular level.
Question 10
Incentive

A tendency to maintain a balanced or constant internal state; the regulation of any aspect of body chemistry such as blood, glucose, around a particular level.
Maslow’s pyramid of human needs, beginning at the base with physiological needs that must first be satisfied before higher-level safety needs and then psychological needs become active.
Law the principle that performance increases with arousal only up to a point, beyond which performance decreases.
Question 11
Yerkes-Dodson law

Theory that experience emotion one must be physically aroused and cognitively label the arousal.
The theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our psychological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli.
Law the principle that performance increases with arousal only up to a point, beyond which performance decreases.
Question 12
Maslow’s pyramid of human needs, beginning at the base with physiological needs that must first be satisfied before higher-level safety needs and then psychological needs become active.

Hierarchy of needs
Pyramid of feeds
Basic needs
Question 13
A desire for significant accomplishment, for mastery of skills or ideas, for control, and for attaining a high standard.

Motivation
Activation
Achievement motivation
Question 14
The point at which your “weight thermostat” is supposedly set. When your body falls below this weight, increased hunger and a lowered metabolic rate may combine to restore the lost weight.

Final point
Glucose point
Set point
Question 15
The form of sugar hat circulates in the blood and provides the major source of energy for body tissues. When its level is low, we feel hunger.

Glucose
Serotonin
Basal metabolic
Question 16
Rate the body’s resting rate of energy expenditure.

Anal metabolic
Basal metabolic
Basic metabolic
Question 17
Selye’s concept of the body’s adaptive response to stress in three phrases : alarm, resistance, exhaustion.

General adaptative syndrome (GAS)
General adaptation syndrome (GAS)
General adaptation of serotonin (GAS)
Question 18
Nder stress, people (especially women) often provide support to others (tend) and blond with and seek support from others (befriend).

Tend and friend
Tend or befriend
Tend and befriend
Question 19
Alleviating stress using emotional, cognitive, or behavioral methods.

Coping
Emotion-focused coping
Problem-focused coping
Question 20
Attempting to alleviate stress directly by changing the stressor or the way we interact with that stressor.

Problem-focused coping
Emotion-focused coping
External locus of control
Question 21
Attempting to alleviate stress by avoiding or ignoring stressor and attending to emotional needs related to one’s stress reaction.

Coping
Emotion-focused coping
Problem-focused coping
Question 22
The ability to control impulses and delay short-term gratification for greater long-term rewards.

External locus of contro
Self-control
Nternational locus of control
Question 23
Learned helplessness

The hopelessness and passive resignation an animal or human learns when unable to avoid repeated aversive events.
The perception that chance or outside forces beyond your personal control determine your fate.
The hopelessness and passive resignation an animal or human learns when unable to avoid repeated aversive events.
Question 24
Sustained exercice that increases heart and lung fitness; may also alleviate depression and anxiety.

Workout
Aerobic exercice
Gym
Question 25
The perception that ne is worse off relative to those with whom one compares oneself.

Relative deprivation
Deprivation
Negative deprivation
Question 26
Phenomenon our tendency to form judgments (of sounds, of lights, of income) relative to a neutral level defined by our prior experience.

Adaptation-level
Adaptative
Positive psychology
Question 27
Subjective well-being

The ability to control impulses and delay short-term gratification for greater long-term rewards.
The perception that you control your own fate.
Self-perceived happiness or satisfaction with life. Used along with measures of objective well-being (for example, physical and economic indicators) to evaluate people’s quality of life.
Question 28
Feel-good, do-good phenomenon

People’s tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood.
The scientific study of optimal human functioning, aims to discover and promote strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to flourish.
Self-perceived happiness or satisfaction with life. Used along with measures of objective well-being (for example, physical and economic indicators) to evaluate people’s quality of life.
Question 29
The scientific study of optimal human functioning, aims to discover and promote strengths and virtues that enable individuals and communities to flourish.

Positive psychology
Relative deprivation
Positive deprivation

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Author : ricogenesis
Difficulty : Medium
Tags : psychology, drug, dream, c...(more)
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